Dizziness classification

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Fatimo Biobaku M.B.B.S [2]

Overview

Classification

Classification of Dizziness[1]
Type of Dizziness Description Origin of Disorder
Type I Dizziness

(Vertigo)

  • Rotational/spinning sensation
  • Often instantaneous
  • Oscillopsia may occur
  • Often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and a staggering gait
Vestibular system disorder

(Peripheral OR Central)

Type II Dizziness

(Impending faint/Presyncope)

  • Sensation of impending faint/loss of consciousness
  • Pallor, dimness of vision, roaring in the ears, and diaphoresis may occur
  • Recovery upon assuming the recumbent position is common
Non Vestibular system disorder
Type III Dizziness (Disequilibrium)
  • Loss of balance without an abnormal sensation in the head occurs
  • Occurs when walking and disappears upon sitting down.
  • Occurs as a result of a disorder of motor system control
Type IV Dizziness
  • Vague lightheadedness occurs
  • It includes dizziness that cannot be identified with certainty as any of the other types

References

  1. Mukherjee A, Chatterjee SK, Chakravarty A (2003). "Vertigo and dizziness--a clinical approach". J Assoc Physicians India. 51: 1095–101. PMID 15260396.

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