Cushing's syndrome natural history, complications and prognosis

Jump to: navigation, search

Cushing's syndrome Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Cushing's syndrome from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Screening

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

Electrocardiogram

Chest X Ray

CT

MRI

Echocardiography or Ultrasound

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Cushing's syndrome natural history, complications and prognosis On the Web

Most recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Cushing's syndrome natural history, complications and prognosis

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

US National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Cushing's syndrome natural history, complications and prognosis

CDC on Cushing's syndrome natural history, complications and prognosis

Cushing's syndrome natural history, complications and prognosis in the news

Blogs on Cushing's syndrome natural history, complications and prognosis

Directions to Hospitals Treating Cushing's syndrome

Risk calculators and risk factors for Cushing's syndrome natural history, complications and prognosis

Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Furqan M M. M.B.B.S[2]

Overview

Cushing's disease can lead to The symptoms of Cushing's syndrome usually start with symptoms such as rapid weight gain, a round face often referred to as a "moon face", and insomnia. It may progress to develop amenorrhoea, infertility and psychological disturbances. If left untreated, patients with Cushing's syndrome may progress to develop diabetes, cardiovascular and psychiatric complications. The prognosis depends on the severity of the disease.

Natural History

The symptoms of Cushing's syndrome usually start with symptoms such as rapid weight gain, a round face often referred to as a "moon face", and insomnia. It may progress to develop amenorrhoea, infertility, and psychological disturbances. If left untreated, patients with Cushing's syndrome may progress to develop diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular complications.

Complications

Cushing's syndrome can lead to the following complications:[1][2]

Prognosis

The prognosis for those with Cushing's syndrome varies depending on the cause of the disease. Most cases of Cushing's syndrome can be cured. Many individuals with Cushing's syndrome show significant improvement with treatment, although some may find recovery complicated by various aspects of the causative illness. Some kinds of tumors may recur. Mortality in patients with Cushing's syndrome is increased even after the apparently successful treatment.[3]

References

  1. Lacroix A, Feelders RA, Stratakis CA, Nieman LK (2015). "Cushing's syndrome". Lancet. 386 (9996): 913–27. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(14)61375-1. PMID 26004339.
  2. "Increased risk of osteoporotic fractures in patients with Cushing's syndrome".
  3. Lodish M (2015). "Cushing's syndrome in childhood: update on genetics, treatment, and outcomes". Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes. 22 (1): 48–54. doi:10.1097/MED.0000000000000127. PMC 4415092. PMID 25517021.




Linked-in.jpg