Burn prevention

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Burn Microchapters

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Primary Prevention

To help prevent burns:

  • Install household smoke alarms. Check and change batteries regularly.
  • Teach children about fire safety and the hazards of matches and fireworks.
  • Keep children from climbing on top of a stove or grabbing hot items like irons and oven doors.
  • Turn pot handles toward the back of the stove so that children can't grab them and they can't be accidentally knocked over.
  • Place fire extinguishers in key locations at home, work, and school.
  • Remove electrical cords from floors and keep them out of reach.
  • Know about and practice fire escape routes at home, work, and school.
  • Set the temperature of a water heater to 120 degrees or less.

References




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