Borrelia mayonii

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This page is about microbiologic aspects of the organism(s).  For clinical aspects of the disease, see Lyme disease.

To learn more about Borrelia burgdorferi, the usual cause of Lyme disease, click here
Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]

Overview

The first description of Lyme disease caused by B. mayonii among 6 patients from Minnesota, Wisconsin, and North Dakota in February 2016.[1]

Historical Perspective

  • February 2016 - The first description of Lyme disease caused by B. mayonii among 6 patients from Minnesota, Wisconsin, and North Dakota. The discovery was made when 6 samples (5 blood and 1 synovial fluid) out of approximately 9,000 samples suspected to have Lyme disease between 2012 and 2014 were found to contain bacteria that were genetically distinct from B. burgdorferi.[1]
  • The term mayonii refers to the Mayo Clinic medical center in Minnesota, where genetic testing for the organism was first conducted.[1]

Associated Disease

Differentiating B. mayonii from B. burgdorferi

The following table demonstrates key clinical and epidemiological features that distinguish B. mayonii from B. burgdorferi:[1]

B. burgdorferi B. mayonii
Transmission Tick bite Tick bite
Distribution in the USA Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, and Midwest regions Midwest region
Bacteria Concentration in Blood (Spirochetemia) Lower Higher
Early Symptoms Fever, headache, rash, neck pain Fever, headache, rash, neck pain
Late Symptoms Arthritis Arthritis
Nausea / Vomiting? No Yes
Rash Characteristics Bull's-eye target lesion Diffuse rash
Diagnosis Serology or PCR Serology or PCR
Treatment Doxycycline Doxycycline

Adapted from Pritt BS et al. Identification of a novel pathogenic Borrelia species causing Lyme borreliosis with unusually high spirochaetaemia: a descriptive study. Lancet Infectious Diseases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(15)00464-8[1] | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). New Lyme-disease-causing bacteria species discovered. URL: http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2016/p0208-lyme-disease.html. Retrieved February 9th 2016.[2]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Pritt, BS; Mead, PS (Feb 5 2016). "Identification of a novel pathogenic Borrelia species causing Lyme borreliosis with unusually high spirochaetaemia: a descriptive study" (PDF). Lancet Infectious Diseases. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(15)00464-8 Check |doi= value (help). Retrieved 9 February 2016. Check date values in: |date= (help)
  2. New Lyme-disease-causing bacteria species discovered - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2016/p0208-lyme-disease.html Accessed on Feb 9 2016

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