Bedwetting definition

Jump to: navigation, search

Bedwetting Microchapters

Home

Patient Information

Overview

Definition

Historical Perspective

Classification

Pathophysiology

Causes

Differentiating Bedwetting from other Diseases

Epidemiology and Demographics

Risk Factors

Natural History, Complications and Prognosis

Diagnosis

History and Symptoms

Physical Examination

Laboratory Findings

X Ray

Ultrasound

Other Imaging Findings

Other Diagnostic Studies

Treatment

Medical Therapy

Surgery

Primary Prevention

Secondary Prevention

Cost-Effectiveness of Therapy

Future or Investigational Therapies

Case Studies

Case #1

Bedwetting definition On the Web

recent articles

Most cited articles

Review articles

CME Programs

Powerpoint slides

Images

American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Bedwetting definition

All Images
X-rays
Echo & Ultrasound
CT Images
MRI

Ongoing Trials at Clinical Trials.gov

National Guidelines Clearinghouse

NICE Guidance

FDA on Bedwetting definition

CDC on Bedwetting definition

Bedwetting definition in the news

Blogs on Bedwetting definition

Directions to Hospitals Treating Bedwetting

Risk calculators and risk factors for Bedwetting definition

Editor(s)-in-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S.,M.D. [1] Phone:617-632-7753; Steven C. Campbell, M.D., Ph.D., [2] Phone:216-444-5595 Professor of Surgery, Residency Program Director, Section of Urologic Oncology, Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic.

Definiton

U.S. Psychological Definition

Psychologists may use a definition from the American Psychiatric Association’s DSM-IV, defining nocturnal enuresis as repeated urination into bed or clothes, occurring twice per week for at least 3 consecutive months in a child of at least 5 years of age and not due to either a drug side effect or a medical condition. Even if the case does not meet this criteria, the DSM-IV definition allows psychologists to diagnose nocturnal enuresis if the wetting causes the patient clinically significant distress. [3]

Other Definitions

Other definitions cast themselves as more “practical” guidance, saying that bedwetting can be considered a "clinical problem" if the child is unable to keep the bed dry by age seven. [4]

D'Alessandro refines this to bedwetting more than 2x/month after the age:

  • 6 years for females
  • 7 years for males. [5]

References



Linked-in.jpg