Altitude sickness historical perspective

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Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Farima Kahe M.D. [2]

Overview

Chronic mountain sickness (CMS) is also known as Monge's disease, after its first description in 1925 by Carlos Monge. High Altitude Flatus Expulsion was first described by Joseph Hamel in c. 1820. It was rediscovered in 1981 by Paul Auerbach and York Miller.

Historical Perspective

Discovery

  • Altitude sickness was first discovered by Paul Auerbach and York Miller in 1981.[1]
  • High Altitude Flatus Expulsion was first described by Joseph Hamel in 1820.[2]
  • The association between smoking and the development of altitude sickness was first discovered in 1986.


References

  1. Monge CC, Whittembury J (December 1976). "Chronic mountain sickness". Johns Hopkins Med J. 139 SUPPL: 87–9. PMID 1011412.
  2. Auerbach P, Miller YE (February 1981). "High Altitude Flatus Expulsion (HAFE)". West. J. Med. 134 (2): 173–4. PMC 1272559. PMID 18748805.



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